Posts by Barry

A Little Humour

»Posted by on Mar 29, 2016 in Environmental | Comments Off on A Little Humour

A retired Drilling Secretary gets pulled over for speeding… Retired Secretary: Is there a problem, Officer? Officer : Ma’am, you were speeding. Retired Secretary: Oh, I see. Officer : Can I see your license please? Retired Secretary: I’d give it to you but I don’t have one. Officer : Don’t have one? Retired Secretary: Lost it, 4 years ago for drunk driving. Officer : I see…Can I see your vehicle registration papers please. Retired Secretary: I can’t do that. Officer : Why not? Retired Secretary: I stole this car. Officer : Stole it? Retired Secretary: Yes, and I killed the owner. Officer : You what? Retired Secretary: His body is in the trunk if you want to see. The Officer looks at the woman and slowly backs away to his...

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Oil from Oil Sands Extraction Technique

»Posted by on Dec 11, 2014 in Environmental | Comments Off on Oil from Oil Sands Extraction Technique

A Cleaner Way to Extract Oil From Oil Sands The secret to business is buy low and sell high. Canadian holding company MCW Energy Group hopes to do that by economically separating the petroleum from oil sands and then selling it at market rates of double to triple the processing costs. The company uses a patented closed-loop technology that treats the sands with a solvent that helps remove the oil. The oil and solvent are separated, with the latter recycled for the next batch of production. According to CEO Gerald Bailey, the finished sand is 99.9 percent clean and can be put back on the ground. The company currently has 1,000 acres in Vernal, Utah, about a 173-mile drive east of Salt Lake City. “Those sands run about 12 percent oil,” said Bailey, who...

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Shade Grown Coffee & Biodiversity

»Posted by on Nov 13, 2014 in Environmental | Comments Off on Shade Grown Coffee & Biodiversity

Shade Grown Coffee & Biodiversity

I’m sure most of us have heard of shade grown coffee and that we might think that this coffee is better for the environment.  Right?  Well the answer is yes.  The following is extracted from a study in Costa Rica (Caudill S., F. DeClerck, and T. Husband and published in Science Direct – Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment Volume 199). There has been much research on the benefits of shade grown coffee for birds and insects.  This new study focussed on small, non- flying mammals and compared their abundance in three shade grown coffee plantations versus sun grown coffee plantations and forest landscapes.  Each of the 3 sites was sampled in four sessions totalling 46 sampling nights.  501 individuals of 17 small and medium mammal species were...

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Beavers as ecosystem builders

»Posted by on Oct 28, 2014 in Environmental | Comments Off on Beavers as ecosystem builders

Beavers as ecosystem builders

Either until recently or perhaps even now, beavers are routinely trapped and shot. The their homes (dams) have been destroyed by dynamite. However, it is being realized and proven that they can help reclaim and rebuild a hydrologic cycle that used to be the norm across much of North America.  This rebuilt hydrologic cycle can now assist in the defense against warmer and drier climate. In North America beavers used to number in the millions and were an integral part of the hydrological system. Some valleys were filled with continuous dams creating numerous wetlands. The population plummeted, largely because of fur trapping, and by the 1930s there were no more than 100,000 beavers, almost entirely in Canada.  Lately the numbers have rebounded to an estimated six...

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Five Ways Climate Change is Affecting Our Oceans

»Posted by on Oct 21, 2014 in Environmental | 1 comment

Five Ways Climate Change is Affecting Our Oceans

This is a brief extract of an article I found in the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) site. While you may disagree with some of EDF’s ideas and methods some of the information presented is worthy of wider dissemination. The oceans have a large capacity to absorb heat and carbon dioxide; however, where is the tipping point to degradation? There is not one simple answer, but it is noteworthy to highlight some of the impacts. Temperatures in the shallowest ocean waters rose by more than 0.1 °C a decade for the past 40 years (that is almost 1/2 °C) and average sea levels have increased worldwide by about 19 cm since 1901. Most of the effects noted below are the response to these changes. 1. Coral bleaching Coral bleaching results in the starvation, shrinkage,...

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